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Plugged In

A brick-tastic Blues Brothers recreation

Plugged In

The 1980 comedy classic "The Blues Brothers" features a slew of car chases, each more outrageous than the last. Relatively early in the film, Jake and Elwood Blues attempt to lose their police pursuers by driving through a shopping mall. The scene features over-the-top destruction and deadpan dialogue by John Belushi and Dan Aykroyd.

"Pier One Imports," says Aykroyd, as if he's making a note to shop there once the heat's off.

Unquestionably, it's a great scene in a movie full of them. Turns out, it's just as amazing with Lego bricks. Duncan McConchie, the mad genius at Bricktease, created a shot-for-shot redux of the famous scene done entirely with Legos. He nails the details. The windows smash, the cars spin and overturn, the shoppers flee and scream, and, of course, the Blues Brothers escape to continue their mission from God.

McConchie posted a side-by-side comparison of the chase scene so viewers can see the differences. And really, there aren't too many. This is a labor of love, and it shows.

Curious about how the clip was made? There's even an 11-minute making-of video.

• Over 5,000 Legos were used. "I'm sure the number is a lot higher than that, but I didn't actually count them all.

• After watching the scene hundreds of times, he constructed a crude map that helped figure out the scale and size of the set.

• He ordered many of the pieces online.

• He used Microsoft Excel to build a scale map that used a colorized grid system.

• It took between 8 and 10 hours to construct the set.

• The final scene where the Blues mobile bursts from the window took four hours to make. It ran just 5 seconds.

All told, it took 20 hours of building, 70 hours of filming and 2,400 photos to complete.

We say it was worth it.

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