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Ouya console gets $15 million in extra funding, delayed to June 25

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(Credit: Ouya)

After securing $8.5 million on Kickstarter last year, the Ouya game console has further guaranteed itself some financial breathing room with a $15 million venture capital injection.

A group led by Kleiner Perkins Caufield & Byers (whose other investments include Zynga and Groupon) has invested the money, which Ouya says will be used to support the Android console's developer community and "meet increased demand" for the retail launch.

That launch has also been pushed back from June 4 to June 25, a notable shift in that it moves the system's arrival out of the news and marketing blast zone of E3.

The investment also brings aboard a gaming bigwig. Bing Gordon, who spent 10 years as chief creative officer at EA, will join the company's board of directors.

"Ouya's open source platform creates a new world of opportunity for established and emerging independent game creators and gamers alike," said Gordon. "There are some types of games that can only be experienced on a TV, and Ouya is squarely focused on bringing back the living room gaming experience. Ouya will allow game developers to unleash their most creative ideas and satisfy gamers craving a new kind of experience."

The investment is a notable one, but it doesn't erase the many concerns some people have with the system. Ouya has been savaged in early reviews, and the company's management has been taken to task for its lack of clarity about a number of issues.

Among those are how many true exclusives the system will have at launch, along with the number of games that will be available to retail buyers. Ouya management has been similarly quiet about whether parental controls will be included on the system at launch At present, there’s no way for parents to prevent kids from playing games they feel are inappropriate.

In addition, the company does not intend to work with the ESRB, the video game ratings board, opting instead for its own screening process. And CEO Julie Uhrman has regularly failed to answer the question about how the company will be compliant with the Children's Online Privacy Protection Act (COPPA).

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